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End of Rosslare Services(Read 8943 times)
End of Rosslare Services on: December 18, 2018, 10:27:17 PM
You would have to put a lot of the blame for this decision on the poor management of the port,over many years, by Irish Rail.
I would guess that the ship has already been sold.



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #1 on: December 18, 2018, 10:34:16 PM

- poor connecting rail and bus services for foot passengers at Rosslare (Dublin is actually a better port to arrive into for tourists

- More importantly though, the Government decided a number of years ago to build an under-used motorway to Waterford instead of one of our closest ports to France .    That decision was the beginning of the end for Rosslare.




Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #2 on: December 18, 2018, 10:55:14 PM
To be fair what could the port of Rosslare have done to help prevent today’s announcement, Dublin Port is obviously bigger but has no better services than Rosslare and no more space for people waiting for/coming of a ferry.

The main difference is that Dublin is Ithe capital city and obviously attracts the most investment and most attention for roads/rail and bus links, which also brings congestion issues which aside from the hours of 3am to 5am traveling around Dublin is a nightmare and unless you enjoy stop start traffic an absolute pain in the proverbial.

For the French sailings Rosslare provided easily accessible departure times, (no traffic congestion issues) (plenty of places to visit if arrived early, Rosslare Strand, Kilmore, Carne miles of unspoiled beaches), plenty of parking in terminal area and great supermarket before departure (SuperValu), easy to access road and rail links.

While it would be easy to criticize I do think we would be unfairly placing the blame on Rosslare Europort for today’s announcement.

For all the people who live South of Dublin, traveling to France has just become more of a chore, leaving earlier to avoid traffic, maybe taking the port tunnel etc to avoid congestion, and ironically in the same week that Rosslare and Waterford ports are being mentioned in the press as available to take up the excess that Dublin cannot cope with.



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #3 on: December 19, 2018, 04:39:23 AM
If ICG > Irish Ferries does follow through on it's intentions not to operate any Rosslare to France services during  Summer 2019, I wonder if any of the other leading ferry operators such as STENA Line or P&O Ferries consider it a viable proposition to provide replacement services to the continent ex-Rosslare to ports such as: Cherbourg/Roscoff/Brest/Le Havre?

Of course if there are hauliers and passengers not willing to use Dublin Port and if Rosslare Europort is unable to organise any alternative operator in time for Summer 2019 then that would only then leave the Port of Cork's Ringaskiddy ferry port where Brittany Ferries operates Cork to Roscoff route again from March 2019 onwards.

Last season Brittany Ferries ran two sailings per week ex-Cork to Roscoff. Brittany Ferries also began operating a direct Cork to Santander service to Spain twice weekly during 2018 which accommodates freight cargo and car passengers. With the possibility of a no-deal-Brexit, this may yet prove to be a very wise move on the part of Brittany Ferries as the service is more geared for freight cargo which would avoid the UK landbridge options or likely congestion at some of the French ports that have direct links to UK ports.

Perhaps we may even see another route option ex-Cork to France following the Irish Ferries decision to axe Rosslare-France services for Summer 2019. After Rosslare, the Port of Cork was always regarded as well-suited for operating services to the continent and if Dublin becomes too congested altogether, this could all favour Cork. Of course a new motorway from Cork City all the way to Ringaskiddy needs to happen anyway as the Port of Cork will be moving all of it's container facilities out of Tivoli to a new facility being built in Ringaskiddy in the coming years. Interesting times ahead no doubt.

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/travel-news/direct-ferry-route-from-ireland-to-spain-will-sail-this-winter-37611774.html   
« Last Edit: December 19, 2018, 04:42:43 AM by awaityourreply »



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #4 on: December 19, 2018, 09:00:26 AM
If ICG > Irish Ferries does follow through on it's intentions not to operate any Rosslare to France services during  Summer 2019, I wonder if any of the other leading ferry operators such as STENA Line or P&O Ferries consider it a viable proposition to provide replacement services to the continent ex-Rosslare to ports such as: Cherbourg/Roscoff/Brest/Le Havre?

Of course if there are hauliers and passengers not willing to use Dublin Port and if Rosslare Europort is unable to organise any alternative operator in time for Summer 2019 then that would only then leave the Port of Cork's Ringaskiddy ferry port where Brittany Ferries operates Cork to Roscoff route again from March 2019 onwards.

Last season Brittany Ferries ran two sailings per week ex-Cork to Roscoff. Brittany Ferries also began operating a direct Cork to Santander service to Spain twice weekly during 2018 which accommodates freight cargo and car passengers. With the possibility of a no-deal-Brexit, this may yet prove to be a very wise move on the part of Brittany Ferries as the service is more geared for freight cargo which would avoid the UK landbridge options or likely congestion at some of the French ports that have direct links to UK ports.

Perhaps we may even see another route option ex-Cork to France following the Irish Ferries decision to axe Rosslare-France services for Summer 2019. After Rosslare, the Port of Cork was always regarded as well-suited for operating services to the continent and if Dublin becomes too congested altogether, this could all favour Cork. Of course a new motorway from Cork City all the way to Ringaskiddy needs to happen anyway as the Port of Cork will be moving all of it's container facilities out of Tivoli to a new facility being built in Ringaskiddy in the coming years. Interesting times ahead no doubt.

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/travel-news/direct-ferry-route-from-ireland-to-spain-will-sail-this-winter-37611774.html

Stena already offer an alternative to Cherbourg.  The existing Cork to France route isn't full either with the addition of Connemara.  In any case theres nothing to say the vast majority of people who used the Irish Ferries service won't move to the Dublin service anyway - after all it is next to the most densely populated area in the country! 
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #5 on: December 19, 2018, 09:03:44 AM
The real issue might be that when they did the sums , they figured out that keeping Oscar Wilde on a seasonal basis no longer made sense.



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #6 on: December 19, 2018, 09:26:17 AM
You would have to put a lot of the blame for this decision on the poor management of the port,over many years, by Irish Rail.

I'm not sure anyone can say it's a surprise. ICG have criticized the fees and lack of development at Rosslare a number of times in the press. It is, however, a baffling move considering what is happening across the Irish Sea at the moment, and how important fast and reliable direct links to France could be next year.



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #7 on: December 19, 2018, 10:53:17 AM
For all the people who live South of Dublin, traveling to France has just become more of a chore, leaving earlier to avoid traffic, maybe taking the port tunnel etc to avoid congestion, and ironically in the same week that Rosslare and Waterford ports are being mentioned in the press as available to take up the excess that Dublin cannot cope with.
I've seen it mentioned elsewhere about the congestion, so I just looked at the timetable, and its actually grand if you step back and think about it.

The departures from Dublin are at 4pm, so checkin at about 2 or 3pm which is most definitely not rush hour when youre heading to the port. 
You arrive back into Dublin just after 10am, so again, by 11 when youre off the ferry and on the M50 the traffic will not be at its peak.
For a realtime example, that arrival time would actually be right about now, and google traffic is currently showing no issues at all on the M50, with just the roadworks at Naas being marked as slow, which being a 60 zone is true .



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #8 on: December 19, 2018, 01:59:05 PM
Local Wexford and other government politicians on the news all of whom feigned shock and claimed they had no idea something like this could ever happen. Being a bit cynical but base on the past record of ICG I would not be at all surprised if they were  pulling a stroke as they did back in 2004.
Would it surprise anyone if a package of government incentives was to be put together in order to guarantee the service?



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #9 on: December 19, 2018, 07:02:56 PM
If ICG > Irish Ferries does follow through on it's intentions not to operate any Rosslare to France services during  Summer 2019, I wonder if any of the other leading ferry operators such as STENA Line or P&O Ferries consider it a viable proposition to provide replacement services to the continent ex-Rosslare to ports such as: Cherbourg/Roscoff/Brest/Le Havre?

Of course if there are hauliers and passengers not willing to use Dublin Port and if Rosslare Europort is unable to organise any alternative operator in time for Summer 2019 then that would only then leave the Port of Cork's Ringaskiddy ferry port where Brittany Ferries operates Cork to Roscoff route again from March 2019 onwards.

Last season Brittany Ferries ran two sailings per week ex-Cork to Roscoff. Brittany Ferries also began operating a direct Cork to Santander service to Spain twice weekly during 2018 which accommodates freight cargo and car passengers. With the possibility of a no-deal-Brexit, this may yet prove to be a very wise move on the part of Brittany Ferries as the service is more geared for freight cargo which would avoid the UK landbridge options or likely congestion at some of the French ports that have direct links to UK ports.

Perhaps we may even see another route option ex-Cork to France following the Irish Ferries decision to axe Rosslare-France services for Summer 2019. After Rosslare, the Port of Cork was always regarded as well-suited for operating services to the continent and if Dublin becomes too congested altogether, this could all favour Cork. Of course a new motorway from Cork City all the way to Ringaskiddy needs to happen anyway as the Port of Cork will be moving all of it's container facilities out of Tivoli to a new facility being built in Ringaskiddy in the coming years. Interesting times ahead no doubt.

https://www.independent.ie/life/travel/travel-news/direct-ferry-route-from-ireland-to-spain-will-sail-this-winter-37611774.html

Stena already offer an alternative to Cherbourg.  The existing Cork to France route isn't full either with the addition of Connemara.  In any case theres nothing to say the vast majority of people who used the Irish Ferries service won't move to the Dublin service anyway - after all it is next to the most densely populated area in the country! 

Like many observers, it seems rather odd that they would have issued this announcement given that if a no-deal Brexit occurs on 29th March (which remains a distinct possibility), you could then have serious traffic congestion and long tailbacks in/around Dublin Port and the surrounding road network.

One has to wonder if government policy could not be tweaked in some way to encourage or offer incentives for services to be provided by the regions to ease pressure on the Dublin region. Shannon was regarded as a positive example of this down through the years.

Irish Ferries used operate a summer seasonal service during the months of June/July/August with a Cork to Cherbourg and Cork to LeHavre routes for a number of years until around 1997 when Saint Killian II/Saint Patrick II were put up for sale. In addition to this Irish Ferries also ran Rosslare to Cherbourg and Rosslare to Le Havre services. Unlike Rosslare, Cork has a relatively large population centre in Ireland's South-West region. Cork city and county saw its combined population rise from 519,032 in 2011 to 542,868 according to census 2016 figures.

https://www.independent.ie/regionals/corkman/news/census-2016-results-show-cork-county-population-rose-by-4-2-35619921.html   

https://afloat.ie/port-news/ferry-news/item/35987-le-havre-500th-recalls-ireland-french-links-past-present
 



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #10 on: December 19, 2018, 08:33:12 PM
Interesting route from OW this evening, very close to Rosslare. It's almost like she is trying to say goodbye to the port.  ;)



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #11 on: December 20, 2018, 12:57:00 AM
I travelled on Irish Continental Line's (ICL) Saint Killian II vessel during October 1985 mid-term break on a school tour to France. Our outward journey was ex-Rosslare to Cherbourg (18hrs) while our return journey was ex-Le Havre back to Rosslare (21hrs). I am surprised to learn that falling passenger numbers have meant that ICG's Irish Ferries no longer believe Rosslare - France services have a positive future. One has to wonder why Rosslare Europort has not managed to secure investment which may have also been a key factor in Irish Ferries decision. That said, I understand that Irish Ferries services to the UK from Rosslare (i.e.) Rosslare to Pembroke is to continue but one has to wonder if Irish Ferries will maintain it's only remaining passenger services ex-Rosslare for much longer if it is not satisfied with facilities/amenities at Rosslare Europort. Why has a traditional gateway port like Rosslare Europort been allowed to become so neglected if it is the shortest sea route from Ireland to France?

I recall when the former B+I Line & Sealink British Ferries temporarily ran "a jointly operated service" for a time on the Rosslare to Pembroke route as I would have travelled on the Earl Harold in July 1989. This was in the days when the B+I Line was in financial difficulties. Not sure if the Rosslare to Fishguard route had also kept operating under Sealink British Ferries during that particular period of the joint service with B+I Line?

Is there still sufficient passenger traffic using both ports in South Wales nowadays?
Irish Ferries: Rosslare to Pembroke service
Stena Line's: Rosslare to Fishguard service
For many years you also had a Cork to Swansea ferry service too!
It would be interesting if a "hard Brexit" situation arose and duty free shopping returned on services between UK and Ireland!



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #12 on: December 20, 2018, 07:56:30 AM
With regard to the hypothetical no-deal Brexit, a 1200lm cruise ferry is hardly the ideal vessel to help clear any backlog.  As I wrote on NI Ferry Site, with SECA looming it could be the case that ICG have taken the opportunity to move an ageing and increasingly expensive to run vessel on while they have a solid offer on the table, instead of gambling on a scenario which might not happen (and which will cause huge harm to Ireland as well as the UK with just the speculation about no deal already having an impact on the economy in IE).

There is a big question mark over what happens on this island which has over 300 border crossings in a "no-deal" scenario.  It could be that goods leaving Ireland will be subject to checks even if going to the EU, in the same way that vehicles are already checked in places like Calais and Zeebrugge.  If a hard border is implemented between IE and NI then Dublin can probably wave goodbye to the significant proportion of traffic which originates in NI (from the top of my head around 40%) given a lot of that is bound for GB.  France is actually a very small market for Irish goods compared to the UK, and Belgium which is a far larger market is a two day sail away.  A read of the contingency plan published by the Irish Government reveals the following port preparations:

Quote
At Dublin Port, the following requirements are being progressed by the OPW and provision is being made for infrastructure including:
- 33 inspection bays for trucks coming off ships.
- Parking for 270 trucks to ensure that trucks awaiting inspection do not
halt other port traffic.
- A dedicated Border Control Post (BCP) for live animals;
- A public office with 8 counters/hatches and accommodation for staff;
- Office accommodation for an additional 144 staff will be required within
the port area; and
- A new traffic management system will be developed in conjunction with
Dublin Port, to manage traffic to/from ferries.


At Rosslare Europort, provision is being made for infrastructure including:
- 13 inspection bays for trucks coming off ships;
- Parking for 35 trucks;
- A dedicated BCP for live animals;
- A public office with 6 counters / hatches and accommodation for staff.

https://merrionstreet.ie/MerrionStreet/en/News-Room/Releases/No_Deal_Brexit_Contingency_Plan.pdf
In short, Dublin will be massively better equipped than Rosslare - hardly surprising given the sheer volume of traffic which flows through the capital.  From a commercial point of view, Dublin Port is closer to the majority of the population as well as the destination for many of the goods coming into the country.  Rosslare of course still has the Stena service to France which uses a far more efficient vessel, as well as Neptune Line who are taking RoRo traffic as well (notably Perennial Freight have a contract with them).  Theres only so much traffic to go around, and with BF increasing frequency from Cork as well something had to give!
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #13 on: December 20, 2018, 12:01:13 PM
Good Summary Steven,



Re: End of Rosslare Services Reply #14 on: December 20, 2018, 07:05:35 PM