Irish Ferries Enthusiasts | Forum

Your guide to Ireland's ferry services

News:New Forums - if you experience any problems, please e-mail [email protected]

2015 Emissions regulations

(Read 14195 times)

TC

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 2
  • WHEN IT MATTERS
Indeed I really dont see Oscar Wilde lasting too long past 2015 , next year will be make or break year for her I'd say , if it can operate viable under the new conditions she may stay for a while , but if it will be hit the way I think it will it will be replaced sooner rather than later. Unlike the ropax's in the fleet Oscar Wilde is not very interchangable and is not cut out for either Rosslare - Pembroke or Dublin - Holyhead due to her low vehicle capacity.
Long term what I think might happen is that we will see a newbuild for Dublin to partner Ulysses , a reconfigured Isle of Innishmore could operate the Rosslare - France services , but this would mean that Isle of Innishfree would have to come back from New Zealand or something new would have to be built for Rosslare - Pembroke (which I really dont see happening)

To be honest I cant really see IOI coming back. Its a shame as she is indeed a lovely ship, even in her sort of mashed up P&Oish livery. At nearly 20, and her good reputation 'down under' I'd be surprised if she came back north.

Oscar Wilde

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 117
What about StenaNordica, she enters the zone to go to drydocl_?

FerryMan

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 124
Do Irish Ferries have any plans out yet about what they plan to do?
http://theloadstar.co.uk/low-sulphur-fuel-costs-problem-short-sea-operators/

"Irish shipping and transport group ICG revealed in its annual report last month that customers of its shortsea and domestic and feeder arm, Eucon, will be asked to pay the extra cost of burning low-sulphur bunker fuel in its ships as a consequence of  new EU directives from January 1 next year........"
Ferry Master

Collision-course

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 877
Do Irish Ferries have any plans out yet about what they plan to do?
http://theloadstar.co.uk/low-sulphur-fuel-costs-problem-short-sea-operators/

"Irish shipping and transport group ICG revealed in its annual report last month that customers of its shortsea and domestic and feeder arm, Eucon, will be asked to pay the extra cost of burning low-sulphur bunker fuel in its ships as a consequence of  new EU directives from January 1 next year........"

That could put Irish Ferries at a serious competitive disadvantage if Stena Line decide not to follow suit and continue using their existing fuel on the Irish Sea which there is nothing stopping them from doing so.

Steven

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 250
Do Irish Ferries have any plans out yet about what they plan to do?
http://theloadstar.co.uk/low-sulphur-fuel-costs-problem-short-sea-operators/

"Irish shipping and transport group ICG revealed in its annual report last month that customers of its shortsea and domestic and feeder arm, Eucon, will be asked to pay the extra cost of burning low-sulphur bunker fuel in its ships as a consequence of  new EU directives from January 1 next year........"

That could put Irish Ferries at a serious competitive disadvantage if Stena Line decide not to follow suit and continue using their existing fuel on the Irish Sea which there is nothing stopping them from doing so.

Pretty sure it only applied to operations in the SECA area.  I think I posted something a while back from IF themselves which said as much but cant remember where (fleet movements?).  Think it was a stock market announcement.
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

Webmaster of www.niferry.co.uk
Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline

Steven

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 250
Could Rosyth - Zeebrugge be next to go?

Quote
Hauliers using the Rosyth ferry service could be trapped “between a rock and a hard place” by planned EU fuel legislation.

From next January the new directive, governing the level of sulphur contained in marine fuel, comes into operation.

This will force either the use of more expensive marine gas oil or the installation of expensive exhaust scrubbers on vessels.

However, installing the system is not always possible, which means ferry operators have no option but to use more expensive low sulphur fuels.

Pledging to continue to offer help to maintain the vital link, Martin Reid, the Road Haulage Association’s director for Scotland and Northern Ireland, said additional fuel costs would have to be passed on to clients.

“There is a limit to how much you can pass on before they refuse to pay it – hauliers are caught between a rock and a hard place.”

The implications of rising costs on the viability of the route has been spelled out in a letter to the Scottish Government by Charles Hammond, the chief executive of Forth Ports.

He said the Rosyth service would be hit disproportionately due to its northerly location.

“This has the potential to severely impact on the financial viability of the existing freight ferry service into and out of Rosyth,” he warned.

Operator DFDS Seaways confirmed it could no longer be commercially viable in its current form.

A spokesperson said: “The main challenge is the cost of operating the service, and there is no doubt that the upcoming sulphur legislation will lead to an increase in those costs of around 20%, if we were to continue running the service as we do currently.

"This would unfortunately mean that the route would no longer be commercially viable, and we are therefore looking for ways to reduce the impact of the sulphur rules on the route.”

Worried about the environmental impact, Green MSP Alison Johnstone said:  “I don’t want more freight lorries forced on to the roads but we also need to reduce high emissions from marine fuel.

“I want to see a much stronger future for our ferry links, so I urge the Scottish Government to provide constructive help to the operators,” she said.

Fife Council has pledged to continue to work with the Scottish Government, DFDS and Forth Ports to find options to minimise the impact of new regulations.

Economic development officer Ross Mackenzie added: “Naturally, we are concerned with the potential impact of the EU Sulphur Directive on Rosyth-Zeebrugge ferry route.”

The DFDS spokesperson said the firm was looking at a number of potential solutions.

http://www.thecourier.co.uk/news/local/fife/eu-fuel-rules-could-spell-end-of-rosyth-s-freight-ferry-service-to-europe-1.553403
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

Webmaster of www.niferry.co.uk
Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline

ferry enthusiast

  • Member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 0
Maybe the emissions issue is affecting which IF ships operate on which routes next year.
A fone call yesterday to IF revealed that they are not yet in a situation to publish next years timetables for Rosslare Roscoff.
We live in Wexford so may go with Brittany from Cork to Roscoff on the Saturday sailing as we need to book our caravan site dates and pitch.
So much for trying to support IF. Oscar Wilde - ideal ship - ideal sailing times.
Chris.

ccs

  • Member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 77
Maybe the emissions issue is affecting which IF ships operate on which routes next year.
A fone call yesterday to IF revealed that they are not yet in a situation to publish next years timetables for Rosslare Roscoff.
We live in Wexford so may go with Brittany from Cork to Roscoff on the Saturday sailing as we need to book our caravan site dates and pitch.
So much for trying to support IF. Oscar Wilde - ideal ship - ideal sailing times.
Chris.

Can't remember when the 2014 France schedule was released but I know that in past years it was often October before Irish Ferries released the sailing schedule for the following year.

Steven

  • Member
  • *
  • Posts: 250
Some more on the Rosyth-Zeebrugge route.  TBH it doesn't look good, though I always wondered about the viability of this route without significant subsidy.

Quote
Rosyth Euro ferry 'no longer viable', warns operator
Gary Fitzpatrick
   
Published: 9 Sep 2014 16:450 comments
THE future of the Rosyth-Zeebrugge freight ferry is in serious doubt with the operator saying the route would be no longer viable with the introduction of new EU legislation on air pollution.

The rules being introduced on 1st January have already resulted in the end for one DFDS Seaways route and fears are growing they could now pull the plug on the Rosyth Euro-ferry.
The EU directive on maritime transport emissions is aimed at tackling the use of cheap fuel with high sulphur content to improve air quality.
The outcome of the environmentally-friendly policy could backfire if hauliers currently going by sea are forced back on to the roads.
Forth Ports chief executive Charles Hammond has warned that “the disproportionate costs increase for the Scottish ferry service will not be acceptable to the current users of the service and that alternative freight routes will be used, utilising southern UK port and transferring the traffic to road”.
DFDS Seaways Rosyth-Zeebrugge route is Scotland’s only continental roll-on roll-off ferry link with three sailings per week in each direction.
A spokesman for DFDS Seaways said, “It’s true that the DFDS ferry route between Rosyth and Zeebrugge is faced with significant challenges and we are working on potential solutions to enable us to continue to offer a service to Scottish industry.
“The main challenge facing this route is the cost of operating the service and there is no doubt that the upcoming sulphur legislation will lead to an increase in those costs of around 20 per cent, if we were to continue running the service as we do currently.
“This would unfortunately mean that the route would no longer be commercially viable and we are therefore looking for ways to reduce the impact of the sulphur rules on the route.
“Our Scottish customers and the Scottish Government have been very supportive, however, we are still looking at a number of potential solutions and we hope to be able to be more specific about the future of this service soon.”
Mr Hammond has written to First Minister Alex Salmond seeking a meeting to highlight the threat to Scotland’s only direct sea link.
His letter began, “I am writing to you on an urgent matter which will have a significant negative economic impact for Scotland. As you were instrumental in securing the ongoing operation of the freight ferry into the Port of Rosyth many years ago, I know you will be concerned that there is now a real and immediate risk of losing this service when new European legislation comes into force next year.”
He went on, “Addressing the implications of this legislation will have significant cost implications for shipping operators and ultimately their customers who use these services, as the ship operators will introduce surcharges to recover these additional costs.
“Furthermore, due to Scotland’s more northerly location within Europe and the UK, it will have a disproportionate effect on services using Scottish east-coast ports versus other ports in the UK as the cost, which is based on fuel consumption. By way of an example we expect the cost unit to be €100 in Rosyth but only €40-50 in Teesport.
“This has the potential to severely impact on the financial viability of existing freight ferry service into and out of Rosyth.
“Indications are that the disproportionate costs increase for the Scottish ferry service will not be acceptable to the current users of the service and that alternative freight routes will be used, utilising southern UK port and transferring the traffic to road.
“The ferry operator – DFDS – runs the commercial freight business to Rosyth from Zeebrugge three times each week. They have indicated to us this week that the extra cost this represents is unlikely to be borne by their customers and therefore the route will become unviable.
“This is Scotland’s only direct ferry freight route into continental Europe and is an important economic generator for Scotland, servicing the chemicals, food and drinks industry and general exports/imports as well as the import of new vehicles for the Scottish market.
“As of 1st January, European Ferry operators and freight forwarders will look to save costs by using alternative ports in England, which will increase road haulage into Scotland.
“We believe that this new directive represents a disproportionate, unfair disadvantage for the Port of Rosyth specifically and Scotland as a whole and I seek your urgent support in this matter, with the aim of, as a minimum, equalising the additional charges between the Port of Rosyth and other north of England ports.”
http://www.dunfermlinepress.com/news/rosyth/articles/2014/09/09/508933-rosyth-euro-ferry-no-longer-viable-warns-operator/


Also involving DFDS


Quote
ECA chaos looms
Europe is facing chaos as it tries to police new rules on greener fuel for ships from next January, according to a leading Baltic shipping executive.

DFDS' environmental and sustainability director Poul Woodall stunned delegates at the Green Maritime Environment Congress at SMM in Hamburg by saying: "There will be no enforcement."

When pressed on this claim by panel chairman Matt Frei, the UK broadcaster, the DFDS man said: "No one has allocated any funds.

"Port state control inspectors check one in 1,000 vessel calls and not even all of those are checked for fuel compliance."

He questioned how more could be done within the same budget.

Woodall said for years governments had been asking shipowners if they were ready for the changes, but now it was possible to "flip the coin" and see that countries are not ready themselves.

A total of 28 member states have signed up to new Emission Control Area (ECA) rules next year.

And Woodall raised the question of which law would apply to vessels of different flags in different ports or in international waters.

He also revealed that DFDS has spent EUR 100m ($129m) on exhaust scrubbers for its fleet and will still have to spend an extra EUR 60m on fuel next year due to the new legislation, compared to a group profit of EUR 50m last year.

He estimated northern European shipping would face a total extra bill of $3bn.

"A lot of companies will go bust," he warned.

Maersk Line's head of sustainability Signe Bruun Jensen said costs were important, but the environment was the major concern.

"Sustainability and profit have to go hand in hand," she added.

The ECA rules will cost Maersk another $250m in fuel per year from 2015 – 7% of its total bunker bill.

It will pass on some these costs to customers, adding between $50 and $150 per feu, Jensen said.

But the company knocked $760m from its fuel bill last year through efficiency measures that cut consumption by 1.2m tonnes.

Both Woodall and Jensen stressed their companies would comply with the rules.

http://www.tradewindsnews.com/casualties/344312/ECA-chaos-looms
Last Edit: September 10, 2014, 03:30:35 AM by Steven
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

Webmaster of www.niferry.co.uk
Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline