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Fuel usage on ferries

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ColmOG

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Hello,

Would anyone have an idea where I could get figures for fuel usage for the various passenger ferries that link Ireland to the UK and France ? I'm curious about the difference between the high-speed catamarans with only passengers and cars compared to the ferries that also bring HGV's.

Best regards,

Colm

ColmOG

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Just to share some digging I was doing.
The Dublin Swift is an old US Marine boat (http://nextnavy.com/meet-the-greenest-ship-in-the-navy-the-westpac-express/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A%20NextNavy%20%28Next%20Navy%29&utm_content=FeedBurner) which has 4 Caterpillar 3618 diesel engines.

According to this page (https://magazines.marinelink.com/Magazines/MaritimeReporter/200110/content/euroferrys-ferry-features-207743) the 3618 uses 1701 litres of diesel per hour at rated speed.

If I take the figure for rated speed and make a wild guess as follows for the 135 minute DublinHolyhead crossing :

  • 15 minutes at average 50% of rated engine speed to get out of port
  • 105 minutes at rated speed
  • 15 minutes again at 50% to get into port

then this gives me 13656 litres of diesel per single trip across the Irish Sea.

Any opinions on how loose my assumptions are ?
Last Edit: August 20, 2019, 12:03:00 PM by ColmOG

giftgrub

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Sounds like a lot of fuel, would hope Itís less at 1.50 a litre.

Davy Jones

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I seem to recall reading somewhere that Stena Explorer averaged 20 tonnes of fuel per trip, which probably is in line with that reported above for swift.

Steven

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I canít give an exact figure for DUBLIN SWIFT as she isnít the vessel she was, but the vessel she was based on and so has the same engines and similar dimensions (the former EUROFERRYS PACIFICA) consumed 127t/24h on paper when built.  By comparison ULYSEES is specified as consuming 120t/24h at 22kt when built (Figures from Shippax designs 01).  Of course there are variables that will affect those figures too and really to get accurate numbers per crossing youíd need to speak to the relevant crew.  Those numbers sound decent for the fastcraft until you consider how much ULYSSES can carry in comparison!
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline

Steven

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I seem to recall reading somewhere that Stena Explorer averaged 20 tonnes of fuel per trip, which probably is in line with that reported above for swift.
According to designs 96, Explorer consumed 400t/24h at her design speed!
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline

Davy Jones

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Is that running constantly for 24 hours or what she actually used making several trips over  a 24 hour period?
Might not be so far off actually. In the early days, running at full speed, and making 8 trips in 24 hours. Reduce that to 1 trip a day and throttle her back, like she did in her later years. OK so I (or the place where I read it anyway) was a bit out, but perhaps 40 tonnes? I'm not going to do accurate maths to find out.

Steven

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Is that running constantly for 24 hours or what she actually used making several trips over  a 24 hour period?
Might not be so far off actually. In the early days, running at full speed, and making 8 trips in 24 hours. Reduce that to 1 trip a day and throttle her back, like she did in her later years. OK so I (or the place where I read it anyway) was a bit out, but perhaps 40 tonnes? I'm not going to do accurate maths to find out.

Thatís per 24 hrs of continuous running - itís the normal measure AFAIK (comparing trips introduces even more variables - different routings, wind speed, cargo onboard, whoís driving...).  Running on two engines as Explorer did in latter years obviously would reduce that consumption significantly, though running at less than her design speed would also have been less efficient with the hulls optimised to run at that speed.  Fast craft have historically tended to run on more expensive higher grade fuel oil as well of course.


I think I have an average per trip figure somewhere for Explorer - goodness knows where though!
Last Edit: August 21, 2019, 11:57:11 PM by Steven
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline

ColmOG

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I was looking at the engines used on the WB Yeats, the 8M43C. On this engine spec doc http://www.bmgs.com.tr/doc/GucSistemleri/Marin/Mak/M43CPropulsion.pdf#page=16 it shows



Anyone know how to calculate l/hour or t/24h from this data ? I was lookign at the lines "Specific fuel oil Consumption" and thinking that the 8 cylinder model @ 100% would be using 177 g/kWh. For this 8000 kW engine that would mean 177*8000 g/hour per engine which is ~1408kg per engine per hour or ~1408 l/hr.

This is less that the consumption of one of the 3618 engines on the Jonathan Swift even though the Wb Yeats weighs 6 times as much.

So I've gone wrong somewhere, any ideas ?


Steven

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I was looking at the engines used on the WB Yeats, the 8M43C. On this engine spec doc http://www.bmgs.com.tr/doc/GucSistemleri/Marin/Mak/M43CPropulsion.pdf#page=16 it shows



Anyone know how to calculate l/hour or t/24h from this data ? I was lookign at the lines "Specific fuel oil Consumption" and thinking that the 8 cylinder model @ 100% would be using 177 g/kWh. For this 8000 kW engine that would mean 177*8000 g/hour per engine which is ~1408kg per engine per hour or ~1408 l/hr.

This is less that the consumption of one of the 3618 engines on the Jonathan Swift even though the Wb Yeats weighs 6 times as much.

So I've gone wrong somewhere, any ideas ?

I love your approach going into the tech docs!  To calculate youíd need to know the MCR (maximum continued rating) used to achieve the service speed and the consumption at that output.  MCR is usually somewhere between 70-85% though itís not unknown to be outside that range either. 

I donít have any figures to hand here but do bear in mind the faster you go the more power (and fuel) you need and it isnít a straight curve either.  The earlier Austal cats were quite thirsty but something does sound off there!
Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 05:30:53 PM by Steven
Steve in Belfast (suburbia)

NI Ferry Site

Flickr: www.flickr.com/tarbyonline